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  • Jul 9, 2018

    Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield has announced it will not pay for emergency visits in six states: Indiana, Georgia, Kentucky, Indiana, Missouri, New Hampshire and Ohio, based on secret lists of...

  • Sep 20, 2017

    Choosing Wisely is an initiative of the ABIM Foundation in partnership with Consumer Reports that seeks to advance a national dialogue on avoiding wasteful or unnecessary medical tests, treatments...

  • May 16, 2017

    “One of the most important elements of patient-centered care is deciding when individuals can’t be safely managed in community settings... Emergency physicians are trained to rapidly evaluate...

  • Mar 20, 2017

    To help the public understand the unique role of emergency medicine in the nation's health care system, ACEP launched a campaign called "Saving Millions" with a series of print ads, radio messages and coordinated editorials in influential communications nationwide. For more information about emergency medicine, go to newsroom.acep.org.

  • Mar 16, 2017

    Get informed. Get involved.

    SUPPORT FAIR COVERAGE

    Insurance companies must provide fair coverage for their beneficiaries and be transparent about how they calculate payments. They need to pay reasonable charges, rather than setting arbitrary rates that don’t even cover the costs of care. Insurance companies are exploiting federal law [EMTALA] to reduce coverage for emergency care, knowing emergency departments have a federal mandate to care for all patients, regardless of their ability to pay.

    “Patients should not be punished financially for having emergencies or discouraged from seeking medical attention when they are sick or injured.  No plan is affordable if it abandons you when you need it most.”
    – Rebecca Parker, MD, FACEP, president of ACEP

    “Many people don’t realize how little coverage they have until they need medical care — and then they are shocked at how little their insurance pays. Others are not seeking emergency care when they need it — and getting sicker — out of fear their visits won’t be covered.”
    -Rebecca Parker, MD, FACEP, president of ACEP

    “Insurance companies must be transparent about how they calculate payments and provide fair coverage for their beneficiaries and pay reasonable charges, rather than setting arbitrary rates that don’t even cover the costs of care. Seventy-nine percent of the emergency physicians who were familiar with the Fair Health database said it is the best mechanism available to ensure transparency and to make sure insurance companies don’t miscalculate payments.”
    – Rebecca Parker, MD, FACEP, president of ACEP

  • May 28, 2013

    “One of the most important elements of patient-centered care is deciding when individuals can’t be safely managed in community settings... Emergency physicians are trained to rapidly evaluate...

  • Apr 3, 2013

    Emergency physicians treat nearly 136 million of the sickest patients each year using just 2 percent of the nation’s health care dollar.

    "There can be no meaningful health care reform or cost control without liability reform."

    David Seaberg, MD, FACEP
    Past President, American College of Emergency Physicians

  • Jun 2, 2012

    “Patients should never be in the position of having to self-diagnose their own medical conditions out of fear their health plans won’t pay... even a skilled physician does not know your diagnosis when you first walk in the door."

    David Seaberg, MD, FACEP
    Past President, American College of Emergency Physicians

  • Oct 20, 2009

    “It’s simply not true... Most people who seek emergency care have medical emergencies. Only 12 percent of patients have nonurgent medical problems, and many of those have the symptoms of a medical emergency, but after examination and testing, we learn their medical conditions are not emergencies, which is good news. But it was still right for them to seek emergency care.”

    Nick Jouriles, MD, FACEP
    Past President, American College of Emergency Physicians