Latest Emergency Medicine Research Highlights The Evolving Emergency Medical Care Landscape - Oct 14, 2016

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Latest Emergency Medicine Research Highlights The Evolving Emergency Medical Care Landscape
Oct 14, 2016

WASHINGTON, Oct. 14, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Leading researchers in emergency medicine will present nearly 500 studies during ACEP16-Scientific Assembly, the annual meeting of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) in Las Vegas, Nev., beginning on Sunday, October 16th. Sponsored by ACEP, the Research Forum will be held in Breakers, Banyan and Lagoon Rooms of the Mandalay Bay Convention Center (MBCC) at 3950 S Las Vegas Blvd., from 7:00 am to 4:30 pm on Sunday, October 16th and Monday, October 17th, and from 7:00 am to 4:00 pm on Tuesday, October 18th.

Researcher physicians will present their latest findings in emergency medicine research, focusing on topics ranging from pediatrics to geriatrics, including cardiology, mental illness, toxicology, injury prevention and public health. The abstracts on which poster presentations at Research Forum are based are published in a special supplement to Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Each day of the Research Forum will feature a special "state-of-the-art" presentation in Lagoon I of the MBCC.

On Sunday, October 16th from 11:30 am to 12:00 pm, Megan Ranney, MD, MPH, FACEP will moderate a discussion with Pat Carter, MD, FACEP and Marian Betz, MD on "What is EM's Role in Curbing the Firearm-Injury Epidemic?" On Monday, October 17th from 10:00 to 10:30 am, Jeffery Kline, MD, FACEP will moderate a discussion of "Outpatient Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism with Direct Oral Anticoagulants." On Tuesday, October 18th from 10:00 to 10:30 am, Jesse Pines, MD, FACEP will moderate a discussion of "Evidence-Based ED Throughput Systems Intervention."

The Research Forum will close with a panel session, "Prime Time Practice-Changers: Highlights of the 2016 Research Forum," highlighting some of the most significant emergency medicine research, from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm on Tuesday, October 18th, in Lagoon I of the MBCC. The session will be moderated by Phillip Levy, MD, FACEP and Alex Limkakeng, MD, FACEP.

Obtain credentials (and the latest daily news about the conference) in the Media Relations Office located in MBCC/ South Building Room Lagoon J, 2nd level, beginning Saturday, October 15th at 1:30 pm. A news media workroom near the Media Relations Office is available for use by the press and has telephones, internet connections (computers not provided) and workspace to conduct interviews. Members of the media who display ACEP16-Scientific Assembly press credentials have access to all educational sessions, the general session, the Research Forum and the Exhibit Hall.

Media Relations Office Hours:




Saturday, Oct. 15          

1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Sunday, Oct. 16             

7:30 am - 5:30 pm

Monday, Oct. 17              

8:00 am - 5:30 pm

Tuesday, Oct. 18              

8:00 am - 5:30 pm

Wednesday, Oct. 19          

8:00 am - 11:30 am

For additional information, contact Julie Lloyd at jlloyd@acep.org, Laura Gore at lgore@acep.org, Mike Baldyga at mbaldyga@acep.org or Elaine Salter at esalter@acep.org.

ACEP is the national medical specialty society representing emergency medicine. ACEP is committed to advancing emergency care through continuing education, research and public education. Headquartered in Dallas, Texas, ACEP has 53 chapters representing each state, as well as Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. A Government Services Chapter represents emergency physicians employed by military branches and other government agencies.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM 2016 RESEARCH FORUM
OCTOBER 16-18, 2016
AMERICAN COLLEGE OF EMERGENCY PHYSICIANS
THE MANDALAY BAY CONVENTION CENTER: BREAKERS, BANYAN AND LAGOON ROOMS

Sunday, October 16, 2016

9:30 – 10:30 am

Room Banyan E

Time-Motion Study of Attending Physician Teaching Activities and Interruptions at a Large Academic Emergency Department (#34)
Presenter: Coplin, M., Mount Sinai St. Luke's-Roosevelt, New York, N.Y.
Interruptions and walking are associated with more teaching, not less, in education of residents.

3:00 – 4:00 pm

Room Breakers J

Trends in Computed Tomography and Ultrasonography Use in Pediatric Patients Presenting to U.S. Emergency Departments with Non-Traumatic Abdominal Pain from 2007 to 2011 (#117)
Presenter: Cohen, J., Children's National Medical Center, Washington D.C.
Rates of CT imaging in children with non-traumatic abdominal pain have leveled off since the introduction of the Image Gently® campaign.

Room Banyan D

Evaluation of the Motor Vehicle Collision Scene to Improve Patient Outcomes (#123)
Presenter: Singh, A., Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, Kansas City, Mo.
Patients involved in a collision in which the steering wheel airbag deployed should be monitored for potentially fatal chest trauma.

Monday, October 17, 2016

8:00 – 9:00 am

Room Breakers D

Mental Health Emergency Department Visits: 24 Hours and Counting, Characteristic Associated with Prolonged Length of Stay (#142)
Presenter: Lippert, S., Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.
The most seriously mentally ill emergency patients had increased odds of emergency department length of stay of more than 24 hours.

Room Breakers J

Clinical Photography Using a Mobile Application in the Emergency Department: Our Institutional Experience (#146)
Presenter: Wyatt, K., May Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
Clinical photography using mobile devices provides a useful adjunct to the typical text-based physical exam and can help emergency physicians document illness severity and obtain teleconsultation from remote subspecialists.

Room Banyan E

Emergency Department Moped-Related Injuries in the United States 2002-2014 (#156)
Presenter: Johnson, N., University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
The number of moped-related injuries has increased substantially in the United States, mostly due to a rising number of riders in the 18-59 age bracket.

Epidemiology of Hoverboard Injuries Requiring Emergency Care (#158)
Presenter: Bandzar, S., New York Presbyterian-University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell, New York, N.Y.
In 2015, there were 15,764 hoverboard injuries leading to emergency department visits, of which children represented 49 percent.

9:00 – 10:00 am

Room Breakers D

Geospatial Analysis of Patient's Home Addresses to Facilitate Pre-Hospital Community Response (#169)
Presenter: Dworkis, D., Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
Geocoding of emergency patients' home addresses revealed that Winthrop and Chelsea, two neighborhoods just outside Boston, were "significant hotspots" for ischemic stroke and that Charlestown, a neighborhood in the north of Boston, was identified as a "significant hotspot" for both opioid overdose and cardiac arrest.

Impact of an Urban Police Department Initiated Jail Diversion of Inebriates to a Sobering Center (#170)
Presenter: Weltge, A., University of Texas McGovern School of Medicine, Houston, Texas
A program diverting patients in police custody for public intoxication to a sobering center resulted in a significant drop in police arrests for public intoxication and a substantial positive fiscal impact for the city of Houston.

Room Banyan D

The Risks of Cancer from Diagnostic Medical Radiation: A Reappraisal (#183)
Presenter: Schultz, C., University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Orange, Calif.
Patients exposed to the low-dose of radiation from even six CT scans do not have an elevated risk of cancer.

Monday, October 17, 2016 (continued)

9:00 – 10:00 am

Room Banyan E

Pediatric Emergency Department Observation Unit Improves Emergency Department and Hospital Flow and Capacity During Highest Census Months (#186)
Presenter: Carstairs, K., Rady Children's Hospital/University of California San Diego, San Diego, Calif.
The addition of an emergency department observation unit improve overall emergency department metrics, such as length of stay and boarding, and reduced hospital admissions.

10:30 – 11:30 am

Room Breakers D

A Cost Analysis of the Choosing Wisely Campaign Recommendation to Reduce ED Imaging for Non-Traumatic Back Pain (#198)
Presenter: Lin, M., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, N.Y.
Maximal implementation of the Choosing Wisely campaign would save up to $641 million every year for U.S. adult emergency department visits with non-traumatic back pain.

The Office or Emergency Department: Where Do Heavy Opioid Users Get Their Medications? (#201)
Presenter: Axeen, S., USC Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif.
The share of opioids obtained from emergency departments is inversely related to patients' overall annual opioid consumption.

Room Breakers J

Randomized Trial of Acupuncture vs. Standard Therapy to Treat Low Back Pain in the Emergency Department (#207)
Presenter: Fox, L., New York University School of Medicine, New York, N.Y.
Battlefield acupuncture is feasible as a complement or alternative to standard therapy for lower back pain in the emergency department.

Room Banyan F

Trends Among Emergency Department Visits for Suicide-Related Diagnoses, 2008-2014 (#217)
Presenter: Brennan, J., University of California San Diego, San Diego, Calif.
Emergency department visits for suicide ideation, substance abuse disorder and mood disorder increased dramatically from 2008 to 2014 while suicide attempts and self-inflicted injury decreased.

11:30 am1:00 pm
EMF Showcase Luncheon

Room Southseas AB

Availability of Primary Care Follow-Up in Greater New Haven After Emergency Department Visit in the Era of the Affordable Care Act (EMF #1)
Chou, S., Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn.
Insured patients without established primary care, regardless of what type of insurance they have, have difficulty obtaining timely follow-up after emergency department care.

Monday, October 17, 2016 (continued)

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Room Breakers D

False Estimates of Predicted Low Acuity Complaints in the Prehospital and Emergency Environments (#225)
Presenter: Schlesinger, S., University of California Irvine, Irvine, Calif.
Alternative Destination Paramedics determined only 84 patients out of 13,622 were deemed appropriate for urgent care instead of the emergency department, despite beliefs that many emergency patients could be treated at urgent care, and 28 of the 84 patients contacted 911 when urgent care offices were closed.

Room Breakers J

Reduction in Emergency Department Visits After Implementing a Care Plan in Patients with Drug-Seeking Behavior: Five-Year Analysis (#230)
Presenter: Rapp, K., Morristown Medical Center, Morristown, N.J.
Care plans are effective as a long-term means of reducing emergency department visits in patients with drug-seeking behavior.

3:00 – 4:00 pm

Room Breakers D

Waiting for Care: Differences in Emergency Department Length of Stay and Disposition Between Medical and Psychiatric Patients (#249)
Presenter: Lippert, S., Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.
Emergency psychiatric patients are admitted and transferred more frequently compared to medical patients, and experience significant disparities in length of stay.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

8:00 – 9:00 am

Room Breakers J

New Chest Compressions Method in Infant Resuscitations (#285)
Presenter: Lee, J., Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea
Two new methods of performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on infants provided stronger compressions with less fatigue and pain for the rescuer.

Room Banyan E

Implementation of Tactical Breathing During Simulated Stressful Situations and Effects on Clinical Performance (#296)
Presenter: Kessler, J., Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Wash.
Intubation during a simulated stressful situation without tactical breathing was 85 percent, while intubation during a simulated stressful situation with tactical breathing was 100 percent.

9:00 – 10:00 am

Room Banyan F

Injury Pattern of Less Lethal Kinetic Impact Projectiles Used by Law Enforcement Officers (#329)
Presenter: Beatty, J., Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, N.C.
The large majority (96 percent) of kinetic impact projectiles, such as rubber bullets used by law enforcement, that were deployed in real world settings against criminal suspects resulted in mild or no injuries.

10:30 – 11:30 am

Room Breakers D

Risk of Exposure to Medical Providers from Patients Who Have Ingested Metal Phosphides (#335)
Presenter: Musleh, A., University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N.M.
Two case studies highlight the extreme dangers of treating patients who have ingested aluminum phosphide and zinc phosphide; in one instance, two providers were hospitalized after treating the patient and the emergency department was rendered unusable for two days.

Room Banyan D

72-Hour Returns: A Trigger Tool for Diagnostic Error (#342)
Presenter: Aaronson, E., Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass.
Of patients returning to the emergency department within 72 hours of discharge, less than 3 percent received anything other than standard care, according to patient chart review.

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Room Banyan D

Impact of Evaluating Patients in Chairs on Emergency Department Length of Stay (#371)
Presenter: Baliga, S., Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich
.
Patients who were seen in chairs – as opposed to stretchers – had an average length of stay of 101 minutes compared to 138 minutes in the control group.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016 (continued)

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Room Banyan F

The Likelihood of Pedestrian Struck Accidents Do Not Increase Near Subway Station Entrances (#383)
Presenter: Rahman, A., St. George's University School of Medicine & Mt. Sinai Elmhurst Hospital Center, Queens, N.Y.
Close proximity to a subway station entrance decreases the likelihood of death or injury specifically in New York City, which suggests that pedestrian foot traffic is a protective factor against accidents.

ACEP Logo.

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SOURCE American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP)

For further information: For more information or for copies of research abstracts, contact: Julie Lloyd, 202-370-9292, As of Oct. 16th: 702-322-3791, newsroom.acep.org, twitter.com/emergencydocs